Bee Guardian Presentation by BackYardHive.com

The Bee Guardians from BackYardHive.com present at
Boulder’s local food restaurant, Shine Restaurant & Gathering Place!

Bee-Guardian

Come join us and learn what is really going on with the state of the honeybee and how you can help be part of the solution! Eating organic food, understanding pesticide use on lawns and gardens, saving honeybee genetics by calling your local bee guardian if you see a swarm this spring… this is all a part of the solution. Come and learn more and meet some local bee guardians!

Corwin Bell from BackYardHive.com  has been working naturally and holistically with honeybees for over 17 years. He has taught numerous classes and given presentations all over the world. One focus for Corwin is to continually design non-traditional bee hives that nurture and respect the honeybee. These hives are non-invasive and encourage a symbiotic experience for the bee and the bee guardian.  Check out his current designs.

Be Part of the Mission
Our mission at BackYardHive.com is to educate people about the importance of improving bee ecology and using beekeeping methods that respect the honeybee. Our hope is that by introducing new hobby beekeepers to the rewards of beekeeping that there will eventually be backyard beekeepers worldwide that will help bring back the feral bee population and improve the genetic diversity of the honeybees. This diversity is critically important to the survival of this most precious natural resource. Come join over 600 bee guardians from the front range and Colorado in this mission!

Where?
To make the connection with bees, pollination and local organic food we chose Boulder’s  Shine Restaurant & Gathering Place. The perfect fit! They serve organic local food from local farms and their food is fantastically healthy! Come and enjoy some eats from their local food menu.
Shine Restaurant’s Menu

Date:  Tuesday February 5, 2013
Time: 6-8pm
Location: 2027 13th Street, Boulder, CO 80302
Directions to Shine Restaurant & Gathering Place
Parking: Metered Street Parking or 11th & Spruce Parking Garage
Admission: $5 (Proceeds go to swarm dispatch 2013)

Bee-on-Dandelion_
Learn more

Natural Bee Guardianship Classes at BackYardHive.com
See our video and mission at BackYardHive.com

Any questions, email karen (at) backyardhive.com

See you soon!
Buzzzzz!

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Colorado Natural Beekeeping classes announced 2013

We have announced our 2013 spring bee guardianship classes in Colorado!
We are excited to offer beginner, intermediate and advanced classes in
Boulder, Fort Collins, Carbondale, and Paonia.
You can register for the classes and find out more information,
at BackYardHive.com

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Excellent presentation on bees by Cornell University Professor, Thomas Seeley

Honeybee Democracy by Thomas Seeley

Honeybee Democracy by Thomas Seeley

We were fortunate enough to attend the presentation in Denver given by Cornell University professor and bee researcher, Thomas Seeley.  Seeley has been researching bees for the past several decades and in particular the communication of bees in a swarm. He calls it “swarm intelligence” and

Here is a link to his presentation:

http://multimedia2.geneseo.edu/GreatDayKeyHinted.mov
((he starts his presentation about 1/4 way into the video))
This presentation was not as relaxed as the presentation we saw in Denver as the crowd was asking questions and Selley was telling funny stories along the way. What an inspiration to see such positive enthusiasm towards the bees!

Seeley has written several books we recommend:
Honeybee Democracy – a great read, fun and interesting comparison to human democracy, but also fascinating information about bees communicating in a swarm
The Wisdom of the Hive -this is much deeper read,  really delving into the details of his studies

Here is a great synopsis of his work studying bees swarms:
Thomas Seeley’s work

enjoy!

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Actress Ellen Page talks about the importance of honey bees!

Actress Ellen Page talks about the importance of honey bees.

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Journaling about your hive

Journaling about your hives is a great way to take note of how the hive is doing and a good way to keep track of things that need to be done with the hive as well as a fun way to refer back to what the hive was like during different stages and over several years.

For me, I always think that I’ll remember everything that goes on with the hives but when I don’t journal about it, I sometimes forget those little important details about the hive and then 3 months down the road I notice the hive is doing exceptionally well or maybe they’re not doing as well as they were the year before, than I can refer back to the journal as to weather patterns, what the hive is doing, how the bees seem, what I did with the hive in the past year, etc. It definitely comes in handy and is very informational to be able to refer to each time when going into your hive/s.

I also like to take pictures of the hive through the window before and after going into the hive as another way of observing the bees and overall hive view. Hive journals definitely become very fun and interesting scrapbooks years down the road as well!

Here is a list of some things to include in you bee journal:

~Date bees where placed in the hive (or year of the hive)                                                             ~Overall temperament of the hive and where the bees came from: local swarm, package of bees, nuc, etc. (Include as much information as possible about where the bees came from including hive type and age of hive)
~Date of first pollen coming in and the source if known
~Date of first dandelions blooming

More things to keep in mind and journal about each time visiting your hive:

~ Date, weather, temperature, time of the day, overall mood of bees, clenliness of landing board, drone population and any other observations you notice.

~If opening the hive, it’s helpful to also include reason for opening hive and your observations while working the hive, what you accomplished or hoped to accomplish, note anything that needs to be done in the hive, prospective date and check it off when completed. Any observations about your hive or the local environment and weather.

~ It’s always fun to take before and after pictures as well as photos through the window at different times of year and stages of the hive.

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Bearding Bees

As the days are getting hotter and the hives are all brooding up for the nectar flows, it’s the time of year that you’ll see large clumps of bees hanging on and around the entrance of the hive to keep cool and let more circulation of airflow into the hive. It’s totally normal and occurs when the hives are all brooded up in the spring and summer as the weather gets hotter both night and day.

During this time of year and into the hot summer months, be sure to check that there is adequate airflow around your hives, your hives are well shaded for a good portion of the day and be sure to keep replenishing the source of water for the bees as they can go through a lot of water on those hot summer days!

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Swarm Season 2011!

The smells of spring are wafting in, dandelions and trees are flowering, the days are getting longer and the bees are buzzing. The honeybee colonies that did well over the winter are flying about in search of early nectar and pollen while deciding that it’s time to spread some of their genes off into the world in the form of swarms. The old queen prepares to swarm just when things are barely getting going again in the spring and she lays an egg in a special cell designed for a future queen bee. The old queen takes off with part of the colony just when the new queen is about to come out of her cell. The rest of the colony stays in the hive with the new queen who shortly thereafter goes on a mating flight and begins her life as the new egg-layer while the old queen and group of workers head off in search of a new home. This process is called swarming and usually happens in the first few months of spring, roughly end of April- early June in Colorado.

When bees first swarm they usually collect on a branch or bush to recollect while sending out scouts to search for a new hive. This is a great time to hive a new colony because in addition to having a stronger genetic knowledge of the area (having overwintered in the local area) through the swarming process, they are also determined to find a new home and are on a mission to build up a new hive starting from scratch.

~~~ BackYardHive Offers Free Honeybee Swarm Removal~~

Swarm season is over for 2011

If you have bees in a structure
(soffit of your house, hollow pillar, attic,or anywhere else)
and you want these bees removed

Please call one of these beekeepers!

Michael Lombard
720-596-4055

or email Jo Haugland
jo.haugland7@gmail.com

For bees in a tree that need to be removed

Please call:

Kevin Morris
720-435-6167

~~~

For more info follow this link to the BackYardHive website Read More….

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