Tag Archives: boulder

Bee Guardian Presentation by BackYardHive.com

The Bee Guardians from BackYardHive.com present at
Boulder’s local food restaurant, Shine Restaurant & Gathering Place!

Bee-Guardian

Come join us and learn what is really going on with the state of the honeybee and how you can help be part of the solution! Eating organic food, understanding pesticide use on lawns and gardens, saving honeybee genetics by calling your local bee guardian if you see a swarm this spring… this is all a part of the solution. Come and learn more and meet some local bee guardians!

Corwin Bell from BackYardHive.com  has been working naturally and holistically with honeybees for over 17 years. He has taught numerous classes and given presentations all over the world. One focus for Corwin is to continually design non-traditional bee hives that nurture and respect the honeybee. These hives are non-invasive and encourage a symbiotic experience for the bee and the bee guardian.  Check out his current designs.

Be Part of the Mission
Our mission at BackYardHive.com is to educate people about the importance of improving bee ecology and using beekeeping methods that respect the honeybee. Our hope is that by introducing new hobby beekeepers to the rewards of beekeeping that there will eventually be backyard beekeepers worldwide that will help bring back the feral bee population and improve the genetic diversity of the honeybees. This diversity is critically important to the survival of this most precious natural resource. Come join over 600 bee guardians from the front range and Colorado in this mission!

Where?
To make the connection with bees, pollination and local organic food we chose Boulder’s  Shine Restaurant & Gathering Place. The perfect fit! They serve organic local food from local farms and their food is fantastically healthy! Come and enjoy some eats from their local food menu.
Shine Restaurant’s Menu

Date:  Tuesday February 5, 2013
Time: 6-8pm
Location: 2027 13th Street, Boulder, CO 80302
Directions to Shine Restaurant & Gathering Place
Parking: Metered Street Parking or 11th & Spruce Parking Garage
Admission: $5 (Proceeds go to swarm dispatch 2013)

Bee-on-Dandelion_
Learn more

Natural Bee Guardianship Classes at BackYardHive.com
See our video and mission at BackYardHive.com

Any questions, email karen (at) backyardhive.com

See you soon!
Buzzzzz!

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Filed under CO, colorado, Events and Press, Hive info, Swarms, Swarms in Boulder

Colorado Natural Beekeeping classes announced 2013

We have announced our 2013 spring bee guardianship classes in Colorado!
We are excited to offer beginner, intermediate and advanced classes in
Boulder, Fort Collins, Carbondale, and Paonia.
You can register for the classes and find out more information,
at BackYardHive.com

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Filed under CO, colorado, Events and Press

Journaling about your hive

Journaling about your hives is a great way to take note of how the hive is doing and a good way to keep track of things that need to be done with the hive as well as a fun way to refer back to what the hive was like during different stages and over several years.

For me, I always think that I’ll remember everything that goes on with the hives but when I don’t journal about it, I sometimes forget those little important details about the hive and then 3 months down the road I notice the hive is doing exceptionally well or maybe they’re not doing as well as they were the year before, than I can refer back to the journal as to weather patterns, what the hive is doing, how the bees seem, what I did with the hive in the past year, etc. It definitely comes in handy and is very informational to be able to refer to each time when going into your hive/s.

I also like to take pictures of the hive through the window before and after going into the hive as another way of observing the bees and overall hive view. Hive journals definitely become very fun and interesting scrapbooks years down the road as well!

Here is a list of some things to include in you bee journal:

~Date bees where placed in the hive (or year of the hive)                                                             ~Overall temperament of the hive and where the bees came from: local swarm, package of bees, nuc, etc. (Include as much information as possible about where the bees came from including hive type and age of hive)
~Date of first pollen coming in and the source if known
~Date of first dandelions blooming

More things to keep in mind and journal about each time visiting your hive:

~ Date, weather, temperature, time of the day, overall mood of bees, clenliness of landing board, drone population and any other observations you notice.

~If opening the hive, it’s helpful to also include reason for opening hive and your observations while working the hive, what you accomplished or hoped to accomplish, note anything that needs to be done in the hive, prospective date and check it off when completed. Any observations about your hive or the local environment and weather.

~ It’s always fun to take before and after pictures as well as photos through the window at different times of year and stages of the hive.

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Filed under Hive info, local climate, Thoughts and ideas....

Swarm Season 2011!

The smells of spring are wafting in, dandelions and trees are flowering, the days are getting longer and the bees are buzzing. The honeybee colonies that did well over the winter are flying about in search of early nectar and pollen while deciding that it’s time to spread some of their genes off into the world in the form of swarms. The old queen prepares to swarm just when things are barely getting going again in the spring and she lays an egg in a special cell designed for a future queen bee. The old queen takes off with part of the colony just when the new queen is about to come out of her cell. The rest of the colony stays in the hive with the new queen who shortly thereafter goes on a mating flight and begins her life as the new egg-layer while the old queen and group of workers head off in search of a new home. This process is called swarming and usually happens in the first few months of spring, roughly end of April- early June in Colorado.

When bees first swarm they usually collect on a branch or bush to recollect while sending out scouts to search for a new hive. This is a great time to hive a new colony because in addition to having a stronger genetic knowledge of the area (having overwintered in the local area) through the swarming process, they are also determined to find a new home and are on a mission to build up a new hive starting from scratch.

~~~ BackYardHive Offers Free Honeybee Swarm Removal~~

Swarm season is over for 2015

If you have bees in a structure
(soffit of your house, hollow pillar, attic,or anywhere else)
and you want these bees removed
we don’t do this service

If you see a swarm please call
Bee Swarm Hotline
720-443-2331

 

~~~

For more info follow this link to the BackYardHive website Read More….

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Filed under Swarms, Swarms in Boulder

Vanishing of the Bees film showing in Boulder

Where: Boulder Public Library
1000 Canyon Blvd., Boulder, CO 80302

When: Oct 27th -Wednesday

Time: 6pm doors open,
Film Starts: 6:30pm promptly

Cost: $10 donation

Why: Because we LOVE the bees!

http://www.vanishingbees.com/trailer/

http://vanishingbees.co.uk/

All admission fees go directly back to
supporting the honeybees through a public outreach program
to bring awareness to pesticide spraying (residential
and commercial) that is adversely effecting the bees.

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Filed under Events and Press

To use smoke or not to use smoke….

OR      

I’ve been thinking and reading a lot about honeybees lately and it makes me wonder about when beekeepers use smoke and the effect it has on the entire hive. We top bar people have it really easy in the way that smoke isn’t at all necessary to use because only one or two combs are exposed at a time in the hive so we’re only aggravating about 1/8th of the bees in the hive at a time and as we file through to the next comb, the last one is closed with the previous one again. It’s a great system in so many ways and for me it’s easy to say “oh, smoke isn’t necessary!” “why stress them out more by causing a fake fire for them and wasting all of that energy they put forth to evacuate and gorge honey when it could be used for cleaning the hive, dealing with pests and collecting food?””Smoke messes up all of the hive’s pheromone sent and ways for communication… it’s hard to get the smell of smoke out of things after being around a campfire and so on… imagine how much smoke residue would be in a hive if it’s been smoked every week for even just one year!”

While I do agree completely with all of the reasons and questions I ask for not using smoke, maybe I’m missing some crucial point about why Langstroth hive users and especially commercial beekeepers tend to use smoke. It could be that the Langstroth hive is designed for speed and to work the hive by quickly being able to take out frames and both because of this and that taking off the lid exposes so much of the hive. Even the organic beekeepers who use langstroth hives use smoke! I wonder what the theory is behind it because it seems so unnatural and rude to just smoke the bees out so blatantly. It could be too that the smoker is a bit of an emblem for the beekeeper and as Corwin has mentioned, maybe we need a new one. Perhaps the artistic hive tool or a grass brush… Any ideas??

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Filed under Thoughts and ideas....

Save the Dandelions in the City of Boulder!

I just got home from an event at the Boulder courthouse on pearl street where about 100 people gathered to protest the spraying of dandelions on city and park property. It was a great event with many kids going up to speak about the importance of dandelions and chemical free lawns. My first thought upon hearing about the city killing the dandelions was: “what about the bees? My hives are right near open space and city property?! They need those flowers!!” I wrote a letter about what I would say on the importance of dandelions for the honeybees so that if I did pluck up my courage and become so inclined to speak at this event, I’d be all set. Sure enough, I decided to read my letter to the crowd with much praise and excitement afterword for bringing up the impact pesticides have on the local bees. Continue reading

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Filed under Events and Press, local climate